Agni: Unboxing

Alright, so in my last post I managed to figure out what, exactly, Agni is. Now the next most pressing question is: How the heck do I get inside it? I’ve got the tech specs now, so I’m fairly confident what I expect to see once I do get in, but a cursory inspection reveals no screws of any kind. Stupid hidden screw techniques.

Chaos managed to figure it out though:

2013-02-26 08.42.27That little piece with the lock slides to one side, causing the entire side panel to pop off. Voila! And we’re inside!

2013-02-26 08.43.46It’s nice and compact, though I like my cases roomier so I can add to them. Definitely not going to be able to fit multiple drives in there. Of note, there does appear to be an optical drive that I’d missed in my earlier rundown (they don’t come with one by default I guess), and… snicker… there’s a 3.5″ floppy drive… lol.  Nice labeling on the cables though.

My first goal was to simply swap out the hard drive with the one I had on hand, already set up for web serving. Notice the tight space though: clearly you can’t slide the drive out of the bay like you would in a larger tower, not without removing the power supply. So how do you….

2013-02-26 08.45.05Oh! Those blue clips, when pressed together, cause the entire bay to undock, letting you lift the bay out and then swap the drive. Very clever, Dell. Very clever indeed.

(At work we have a system which actually has a bay open to the exterior of the machine, letting you simply flip some clips to disengaged and slide the drive entirely out without opening the case. I love that system. This is nice too though!)

2013-02-26 08.46.17Alright, now to slide the smaller but already configured drive in and…. uh-oh. Problem.

2013-02-26 08.47.32

Old drive on left, new on right

The old drive is… IDE, and the new is SATA. (The specs said something about slimline, but this doesn’t look slimeline, so I’m going to go with normal SATA) I clearly need an adapter  Unless….. I do have other machines in the house… and while transfer via ethernet takes for friggan EVER, it is feasible. Hmm…. I’ll have to ponder this further.

 

 

 

 

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3 Responses to Agni: Unboxing

  1. Firedrake says:

    The internals of those boxes aren’t bad at all. They remind me of some of the IBM machines, when IBM still made desktop computers – no sharp edges, everything clearly laid out. But yeah, I gave up on trying to get a second drive into mine.

    SATA/IDE adaptors do exist, but they’re slow and unreliable IME – and might well not fit in the limited space you have available. I would seriously recommend the ethernet transfer. Another approach would be to get a USB drive adaptor – I’ve got one that terminates in SATA and IDE plugs, no enclosure, just the adaptor – and stick the old drive in the back of the new machine for the transfer. In neither case do you get to boot off it, though; you’d be setting up a new installation of your hosting OS and copying on the data.

    Which may be a good idea anyway, especially if you want to treat it as a learning experience.

    As may be rather too obvious, I do a lot of this stuff for fun.

    • yamikuronue says:

      😀

      The concern I have with transferring data is that since I set everything up the first time years ago, and it’s a linux box, I’m likely to miss some minor configuration files that’ll make the whole thing come crashing down around me and take a week to debug, lol. Hence why I just wanted to do a whole-disk copy and keep going. I do think that cable idea is the best yet, though; I was looking into cables and enclosures earlier, and while I’d strongly prefer whatever I can find locally over ordering online, I think the USB cable is probably the best idea.

      Also it turns out my other desktop uses SATA instead of IDE anyway, so pooey on that idea.

      • Firedrake says:

        One thing to be aware of: if the old system is a 32-bit Linux installation (I don’t think you said), it is far far easier to set up a new 64-bit one and copy data than to try to upgrade in place.

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