RSS Quickies: Kids and porn

Disclaimer: I am not a parent. However…

Your Kid Saw Porn Online. Now What?

First of all, this depends on the age of the kid. At some point it’s perfectly normal for them to be seeking out porn on their own. But this article appears to be talking about smaller children finding it on accident.

So what’s a parent to do?

The ways parents handle the situation, according to the Times, include:

1. Trying to prevent kids from seeing explicit content by limiting access to the Internet.

Wait. The opening quote was:

With more kids browsing the Internet at younger ages, an article today’s New York Times warns:  ”Your child is going to look at porn at some point. It’s inevitable.”  Now what?

So if it’s inevitable, how does preventing it handle the situation? Wait, the situation was “my kid saw porn”. Isn’t this closing the door after the cows got out?

2. Teaching kids to click away from suggestive material if it appears onscreen.

3. Having conversations about pornography and how to behave responsibly when confronted with sexually explicit content online.

“Responsibly” here meaning “FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DON’T LOOK! THAT WOMAN’S NAKED! RUN AWAY!”

 

I don’t even.

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5 Responses to RSS Quickies: Kids and porn

  1. Jarred H says:

    The whole subject is clearly being filtered through the “oh my god sex porn is bad!” lens of our society. People need to get over that.

    If a “child” happens to becomes exposed to porn, it’s basically because of two reasons:
    1. They were looking for it, in which case it’s time to have calm and rational discussion with your child about their sexuality, their desires, and their curiosities.
    2. They ran across it by accident (e.g. they were searching for information on breast cancer for a school project and got more than they bargained for, they were searching for Persian cats and google didn’t realize that persiankitty.com was not actually about Persian cats, etc). In that case, talking to your child about what they saw and how it made them feel is a good idea. That conversation will give you an idea of where to go next.

    In neither situation is freaking out and going “oh no! my child has been exposed to porn!” a helpful response. In fact, all it’s going to do is tell your child that sex is filthy and bad.

  2. And, of course, there’s porn and then there’s porn. I’m perfectly prepared to believe that som porn does cause mental scarring (not so sure about the sinfulness).

    TRiG.

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